“Embrace obstacles, they are just telling you to go back and revisit your path.”

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“Embrace obstacles, they are just telling you to go back and revisit your path.”

–  The JavaScript Forum

We are learning JavaScript and jQuery for two weeks. The projects are very similar to  the jQuery projects on Code Academy. The material provided a cursory introduction to JavaScript, but I could probably dive into using jQuery now.

 For you fellow newbs, jQuery is a library of JavaScript code used to build dynamic features like sliders, accordions, widgets and interactive animations into websites. We learned about jQuery syntax, event handlers, styling, and traversing the DOM. In addition to Code Academy, I supplemented with Code School’s try jQuery course : http://try.jquery.com/levels/6/challenges/1.

Per the suggestion of classmates, I’m really excited to dive into this great book on JavaScript & jQuery:

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It’s a very user friendly text-book.You can find it on Amazon here: http://www.amazon.com/JavaScript-JQuery-Interactive-Front-End-Development/dp/1118531647

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We are also learning about Git.

Git is not the same as gitHub. Git is a Version Control System (VSC) that enables developers to save every draft of their code. If you decide you want to go back to an earlier version, everything is saved and recorded by Git. Github is a social sharing website where developers can upload or ‘push’ their code, and work on a project simultaneously without stepping on toes. Github is similar to working on a GoogleDoc – you can work on the same document remotely, and see what other people are contributing. But, unlike Google Docs, you can work offline, and you can’t delete or over write anyone else’s work. Developers use VCSs to save every piece of code written by any one team member – so nothing gets lost, and everyone is on the same page at all times.

There are three phases of Git: 1. Working Directory, 2. Staging Area, 3. Repository. When you are writing or making changes to code, you are in the working directory. You pull the code from the git repository you want to work from, and bring it into your working directory. Then before you finally ‘push’ your code back to the git repository, it goes to a place called ‘The Staging Area’. When code is ‘staged’ you can still make changes that won’t be saved.  Finally, you commit your code to the git directory/repository that is then posted on your gitHub.  All this is done on your console.

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Here are some other resources for learning Git that I’ve found useful:

Pro Git – : http://git-scm.com/book/en/v2 – you can download the book for free as a PDF.

Git – The simple guide: http://rogerdudler.github.io/git-guide/

15 min tutorial – Try Git via Code School: https://try.github.io/levels/1/challenges/1

More of Difference between Git + Github: http://www.jahya.net/blog/?2013-05-git-vs-github

Let me know if you find these helpful, and feel free to leave more resources in the comments section!

You know what else was exciting this week?? I am on the Leaderboard for Code Academy Labs!

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Choose to conquer life.

~

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